What Children’s Books Do You Hold Close To Your Heart? And Some New Ones to Add to the List

Children’s books have a funny way of sticking around in our minds and in our hearts. They catch us in our earliest days of reading, and they’re often beautifully poignant, sweet, or sad in ways that adult books struggle and fail to capture. Some children’s books stay with us forever. I’m thinking about books like THE GIVING TREE or CHARLOTTE’S WEB; these books teach us about death, about hardship, and also about generosity, friendship, and love.

So what books from your childhood still have a special place on your shelf or in your heart? Which books would you want to read to future kids in your life, whether it’s as a teacher, parent, or cool aunt/uncle? Here are some faves of mine, as well as some new recommendations for children’s books that might reach that special place in your life.

CHARLOTTE’S WEB: Yes, this is the big granddaddy of sweet, sad, moving books. We grow to love Wilbur, Charlotte, Templeton the Rat, and all the rest; and we learn about compassion and the cycle of life.

A CRICKET IN TIMES SQUARE: I loved this one, involving a country Connecticut cricket who finds himself in the subway station of Times Square, befriending cats, rats, and bodega owners. It’s beautiful and funny too.

Z FOR ZACHARIAH: This one falls more in the category of young adult, but it stayed with me long after I read it (for the third or fourth time). In a post-nuclear world, one little valley seems to have avoided the fallout that has spread across the rest of the globe. There’s just one girl there, until a man arrives with a suit that can withstand radiation. But there’s only one suit — and he’s very protective of it.

Check out this article to see some new children’s books that are sure to move you: http://www.bustle.com/articles/41588-7-childrens-books-that-are-even-more-healing-than-the-self-help-section

And how about adding YOUR favorite books to the list? What children’s books should be handed down from generation to generation?

One comment

  1. Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.
    James M. Barrie’s Peter Pan
    All of Noel Streatfield’s Shoes books

    I wasn’t a huge fan of The Wind in the Willows but many people love it.

    Robert A. Heinlein’s juvenile sci fi novels, especially Farmer in the Sky

    just to name a few

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